GTT60: Galilean Type Telescope of 60mm aperture

The GTT60 is the longest scope on the rig.
Figure 1: The GTT60 is the longest scope on the rig.
One the subjects encountered during my research on nautical instruments that fascinated me most was Galileo Galilei's early seventeenth century proposal for longitude finding at sea. Galilei had discovered the first four moons of Jupiter (Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto) in 1610 (for pictures see the astrophotography page) and soon realised that they formed a heavenly clock that could potentially be used as a reference clock in the determination of longitude by comparing tabulated times of the moments its moons touched the Jovian limb with times from onboard observations.

In order to test Galilei's method a Galilean Type telescope was added in September 2018. For this I acquired a 60mm objective lens (focal length 1490mm) and a 30x concave ocular (focal length -50mm) from Dr. Roger C. Ceragioli, an optical engineer and professional telescope maker at the Richard F. Caris Mirror Lab, University of Arizona, Tucson (USA). In December he provided additional concave oculars for 20x and 40x magnification. He had made these four lenses for his own research and deliberately made the objective lens of bad figure and polish to mimic the quality that could be achieved in Galilei's time (results of this can be found at the ATS Forum).

The objective lens is stopped down to 30mm using a dedicated brass lens cap.
Figure 2: The objective lens is stopped down to 30mm using a dedicated brass lens cap.
Later I added two concave eyepieces for magnifications of 10x and 7.5x in order to be able to project a full solar disc. Being of bad figure and polish the objective lens needs to be stopped down to 30mm aperture (see figure 2), a method commonly applied in the early days of astronomy, in order to get reasonable images.

The OTA I created myself using a motorised Moonlite CS model focuser, an 80x1.5mm aluminium tube (see figure 5), some additional home-made aluminium and bronze parts, and a 2" star diagonal. The scope saw first light at daytime on 28 September 2018 and at night on 3 October that year. Having a 60mm aperture I named the telescope GTT60 (Galilean Type Telescope of 60mm aperture).

Initially mounted in the Lunt rings (see figure 6), the GTT60 was given its final position between the C11 and Esprit in the last week of November 2018 (see figure 1). In order to be able to align it with the other telescopes I created a set of rings (see figure 3 and figure 4) that can be adjusted in right ascension and declination. These rings are mounted on cross-bars that are fastened to the ADM Losmandy style side-by-side plate.

If you have any questions and/or remarks please let me know.

The freshly machined parts for the GTT60 mounting, ready for anodising.
Figure 3: The freshly machined parts for the GTT60 mounting, ready for anodising.
 
The finished GTT60 mounting rings, the one in front can be adjusted in RA and DEC direction.
Figure 4: The finished GTT60 mounting rings, the one in front can be adjusted in RA and DEC direction.

The freshly built OTA of the GTT60.
Figure 5: The freshly built OTA of the GTT60.
 
First light with the GTT60 mounted in the Lunt rings.
Figure 6: First light with the GTT60 mounted in the Lunt rings.

The GTT60 is porperly labelled to explain its purpose for future owners.
Figure 7: The GTT60 is porperly labelled to explain its purpose for future owners.
 
Saturn imaged afocal through the GTT60.
Figure 8: Saturn imaged afocal through the GTT60.

InFINNity Deck Astrophotography Astro-Software Astro Reach-out Equipment
SkyWatcher Esprit 150ED Celestron C11 XLT EdgeHD Lunt LS80THA GTT60 SkyWatcher Explorer 300PDS 10Micron GM3000HPS